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Update – July 25, 2021

We updated this blog post to include updated information and guidance from the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Note: Because this is a constantly changing situation, any data in this blog post may not represent the most up-to-date information. We will update this blog when possible.


In December 2019, a new coronavirus named SARS-CoV-2 started spreading and triggered a pandemic (worldwide outbreak). This coronavirus causes an illness known as COVID-19.

The coronavirus spreads through close contact from person to person. A person with the virus can spread it to others by talking, coughing, sneezing, singing, or breathing. The virus will be in large or small droplets that are exhaled from the mouth or nose out into the air.

If you are within 6 feet (2 meters) of someone who is ill with COVID-19, you may be at greatest risk for becoming infected. But it may be possible to catch the virus even if you are more than 6 feet away from an infected person because very small droplets can spread in the air. If someone who is sick coughs on or near your face, you may get infected. People may be infected with the coronavirus and not show any symptoms. They may spread the virus without knowing it. The virus may also spread through direct contact with a person who has COVID-19.

What Are the Symptoms of COVID-19?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO), COVID-19 symptoms can include:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or trouble breathing
  • Feeling tired and weak
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Stuffy or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

If you or someone you know has these emergency warning signs, call 911 or go to the emergency room immediately:

  • Trouble breathing or shortness of breath
  • Pain or pressure in the chest that doesn’t go away
  • Newly confused
  • Can’t wake up or stay awake
  • Cyanosis which is tissue color changes on mucus membranes (like tongue, lips, and around the eyes) and fingertips or nail beds – the color appears grayish or whitish on darker skin tones and bluish on lighter skin tones

According to the CDC, this list may not include all symptoms. If you have any symptoms that are severe or concerning, call your doctor.

The CDC warns that symptoms may appear two to 14 days after coming in contact with the virus.

How Can I Tell the Difference Between Asthma, COVID-19, the Flu, a Cold, or Seasonal Allergies?

Some symptoms are similar between these respiratory illnesses. Respiratory illnesses may worsen asthma, so it’s important to keep taking your asthma medicines. If you have a fever and a cough, call your doctor. If you have seasonal allergies, there are things you can do to treat them at home. If your allergy symptoms are hard to control, make an appointment with an allergist.

This chart can help you figure out if you may be feeling symptoms of asthma, allergies, or a respiratory illness like COVID-19, the flu, or a cold:



Are People With Asthma at Risk of Severe Illness From COVID-19?

Many studies show that having asthma does not put you at a greater risk of getting COVID-19 or having severe COVID-19.1,2,3 A study published in “The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice” (JACI: In Practice) found that people with well-controlled asthma have less severe COVID-19 outcomes than people with uncontrolled asthma.4

The CDC continues to list moderate-to-severe asthma as a chronic lung disease that can make you more likely to have severe illness from COVID-19.

No matter what, it is important to keep your asthma well-controlled. If your asthma is not under control, you are at a greater risk in general of having an asthma episode or attack, going to the emergency room, staying in the hospital, or even death. If you feel like your asthma is not well-controlled, talk with your doctor as soon as possible.

Even though people with asthma are not at the highest risk for COVID-19, it is still important to keep your asthma under control. Common medicines you may take for asthma and allergies do not increase your risk of getting COVID-19. They will help you keep your asthma under control. You are at greater risk for having an asthma attack if you stop taking your medicines. Take your medicines at the first sign of symptoms as listed on your asthma action plan. Continue to take these medicines as prescribed:

  • Quick-relief medicine (such as albuterol)
  • Inhaled corticosteroids (controller medicines)
  • Oral corticosteroids (such as prednisone)
  • Biologics
  • Antihistamines (allergy medicine)
  • Proton pump inhibitors for acid reflux
  • Nasal allergy sprays
  • Allergy shots

If you have any questions about asthma medicines and COVID-19, talk with your doctor.

If you need to take quick-relief medicine (such as albuterol) for an asthma episode, use an inhaler (with a spacer if directed by your doctor) if possible. Using a nebulizer can increase the risk of sending virus particles in the air if you are sick. But if you have a nebulizer and solution, it is OK to use it to treat an asthma episode. When using a nebulizer, limit the number of people in the room or use it in a room by yourself.

How Can I Avoid Getting COVID-19 (And Other Respiratory Infections)?

The following steps will help you avoid COVID-19, the flu, and other respiratory infections:

1. Get your vaccines.

Vaccines can help protect you, your loved ones, older adults near you, teachers, and essential workers from getting a respiratory infection. They can also cut down your symptom severity if you do get sick. Vaccines reduce the burden on our health care system by reducing the number of people who get COVID-19 or the flu.

Everyone who is 6 months and older can get a COVID-19 vaccine for free with no out-of-pocket costs in the United States. There are currently four vaccines available: Pfizer, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson (J&J), and Novavax.

Visit vaccines.gov to find out where you can get the COVID-19 vaccine near you. Most people can get the COVID-19 vaccine with no issues. Allergic and adverse reactions are rare.

The flu vaccine is recommended for everyone age 6 months and older with rare exceptions.

It is safe to get both the COVID-19 vaccine and the flu vaccine at the same time.


2. Wear a mask.

Face masks can help reduce the spread of the coronavirus. They can benefit people who are vaccinated and unvaccinated alike. Some people may have COVID-19 and not show symptoms for a few days, while some may not have any symptoms at all. And some vaccinated people have gotten breakthrough infections, which have usually been mild.

Wear a mask that fits snugly on your face, and covers your nose, mouth, and beard completely. Wear a mask when you leave your home, if you are caring for someone at home who is sick, and if you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19. People with asthma should be able to wear face masks.

Face masks offer other benefits as well. They can reduce your exposure to pollen, air pollution, and other respiratory infections like the flu.


3. Keep a physical distance from people outside your household.

In general, the more closely you interact with other people and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of coronavirus or flu spread. Try to stay home when possible when these illnesses are spreading in your community. Avoid large crowds of people, especially in indoor locations. When in public, keep at least 6 feet apart. Stay away from people who are sick or have been in contact with someone who is sick. Even when you’re at home with family, don’t share makeup, food, dishes, or eating utensils.

Postpone any unnecessary travel during the COVID-19 pandemic. See the CDC’s guidelines on how to protect yourself at specific locations and in certain situations, such as shops, public places, gatherings, and more.

4. Wash your hands properly and often.

Use soap and warm water to wash your hands for 20 to 30 seconds. Always wash your hands before and after eating and after coughing or sneezing. Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth.

If you don’t have access to running water, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that is at least 60% ethyl alcohol (ethanol) or 70% isopropyl alcohol (isopropanol).


5. Make sure your indoor spaces are well-ventilated and have good indoor air quality.

If you are staying indoors more because of COVID-19, be mindful of the quality of your indoor air. The air inside our homes can often be more polluted than the air outside. Unhealthy indoor air can be full of asthma triggers and allergens that can cause symptoms and make your asthma harder to control. Take steps to improve and maintain healthy indoor air quality.

Air circulation is important too. Keep your indoor spaces well-ventilated by opening windows or doors, using fans, running air cleaners, or using proper air filters in your HVAC system.

Current evidence shows the risk of the coronavirus spreading is much lower outdoors than indoors. Good ventilation in your indoor environment may help reduce the spread of the coronavirus. It may also affect the risk of transmission (how fast it spreads).

On days when pollen is low and air quality is good, open your windows to let in fresh air. Run your HVAC system as much as possible (especially when windows are closed). Use high efficiency air filters in your HVAC system and replace them at least every three months.


6. Take care of your health.

Take your asthma control medicines as directed to keep your airways open. Eat well and get enough sleep.

Pollen (such as grass or ragweed pollen) may impact people across the U.S. too. Seasonal allergies can affect people with allergic asthma. If pollen allergies trigger asthma symptoms for you, be sure to follow your allergy treatment plan to keep your allergies under control to prevent asthma episodes or attacks.

If you stopped seeing your allergist or getting allergy shots (immunotherapy) during the COVID-19 pandemic, consider making an appointment soon. Keeping up with your regular allergist visits is an important part of keeping your asthma controlled.

The most important thing you can do is to keep your asthma under control. If your asthma is not under control, call your doctor right away.

In general, tracking your symptoms and following your asthma action plan are key to managing your asthma. Some people use peak flow meters to monitor their airways. Monitoring your blood oxygen levels with a pulse oximeter (or “pulse ox”) is not a recommended part of home management of asthma. Many pulse oximeters you can buy for home use are not as accurate as medical grade devices.

It is important to remember that the symptoms you feel should always come before pulse ox and peak flow numbers. But if your peak flow numbers are down and you don’t have symptoms, follow your asthma action plan and contact your doctor.

There are no data demonstrating that monitoring your pulse ox through an oximeter or smartphone app will help manage your asthma. As always, talk with your doctor about the best ways to monitor your symptoms and asthma control.6

If I Think I Have COVID-19, What Should I Do?

If you start having symptoms of COVID-19, get tested or take an at-home test. If you have mild symptoms and are not at high risk for having more severe COVID-19, you do not need to call your doctor. Call your local health department within 24 hours to let them know so they accurately report local cases.

If you are at high risk for severe COVID-19, call your doctor within 24 hours if you test positive. They may want to you to take the medicine Paxlovid.

Many pharmacies have various testing options (including at-home or drive-thru tests). The United States Postal Services is providing free at-home COVID-19 tests. U.S. households can get eight rapid antigen COVID-19 tests for free. To receive them, you’ll need to complete an online form. Please note: You will not need to enter any credit or debit card details to place the order.

Some doctors may offer telehealth (video or virtual appointments). If that is an option, ask your insurance company if telehealth is covered under your plan. And if you have Medicare, you might be able to have a virtual visit with your doctor. The government expanded the coverage of telehealth services during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Stay home and isolate from family members so you don’t spread the coronavirus to other people.

Medical Review, July 2022 by Mitchell Grayson, MD

How do you stay healthy and avoid asthma symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic? Join our community to stay up to date on protecting yourself from COVID-19.

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References
1. Chhiba, K.D., Patel, G.B., Vu, T.H.T, Chen, M.M., Guo, A., Kudlaty, E., Mai, Q., Yeh, C., Muhammad, L.N., Harris, K.E., Bochner, B.S., Grammar, L.C., Greenberger, P.A., Kalhan, R., Kuang, F.L., Saltoun, C.A., Schleimer, R.P., Stevens, W.W., & Peters, A.T. (2020). Prevalence and characterization of asthma in hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients with COVID-19, Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2020.06.010.
2. Butler, M. W., O’Reilly, A., Dunican, E. M., Mallon, P., Feeney, E. R., Keane, M. P., & McCarthy, C. (2020). Prevalence of comorbid asthma in COVID-19 patients. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2020.04.061
3. Lieberman-Cribbin, W., Rapp, J., Alpert, N., Tuminello, S., & Taioli, E. (2020). The Impact of Asthma on Mortality in Patients With COVID-19. Chest. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chest.2020.0air pol.575
4. Huang, B. Z., Chen, Z., Sidell, M. A., Eckel, S. P., Martinez, M. P., Lurmann, F., Thomas, D. C., Gilliland, F. D., & Xiang, A. H. (2021). Asthma disease Status, COPD, and COVID-19 severity in a large Multiethnic POPULATION. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2021.07.030
5. Kampf, G., Todt, D., Pfaender, S., & Steinmann, E. (2020). Persistence of coronaviruses on inanimate surfaces and their inactivation with biocidal agents. Journal of Hospital Infection, 104(3), 246–251. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2020.01.022
6. Heneghan, C. (2018, January 30). Self-management of asthma – is there an app or pulse oximeter for that? Retrieved from https://blogs.bmj.com/bmjebmsp...-app-pulse-oximeter/

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Comments (131)

Newest · Oldest · Popular

hello , i have excerice enducted asthma and i never get asthma atacks beside when i run or do a lot of sports , did not have any atacks since like 7 months im i still going to die if contact covid 19 ? or is it only for people that have uncontrolled asthma  , last time i did the flow test i scored 250 

karim

Thanks for the prompt reply. 

Unfortunately though, restocking and inventory is also being done outside, along the aisles. And with the store that am working with, they are 80% more concerned with customer satisfaction.  I have requested for a doctors appointment and I’ll check with him if he can give me a certification or something that i can give to our management.

Thanks much.

R

Hi Ruby and welcome. I understand your concern about being a high-risk category and being exposed to a lot of different people working in retail. What about talking to your supervisor about doing more things away from customers? Restocking or inventory maybe?

Kathy P

In a couple of years, I’ll turn 60...work in retail too. Though i feel strong and somewhat healthy for a person with asthma, i have to admit that i am worried and scared coz of covid. Am not sure that if i ask my company for a leave of absence if they’d accept, what should i do?

R
Lorene posted:
I Am Curious posted:

to echo @Lara, same for sore throat and chest tightness, particularly for those with both asthma and allergies. Postnasal drip causes a sore throat for me and I always have a tight chest around dust and ragweed. Those are the literal symptoms of COVID-19... I guess you can't please everyone and nothing is ever clear, ha. We have to do our best to pay close attention to our bodies, ask ourselves if what we are experiencing is unusual and act accordingly. 

Hi - you and @Lara bring up good points! Do you find that you are more in tune with your body due to allergies and asthma? I think I am, although I still often ignore signs and symptoms :-) A fever may be the 1 symptom that notifies us something else may be going on. 

Sometimes.  Sometimes it is exhausting feeling ill the time, so I try to disengage from what is happening to my body.  I very seldom get a fever, even with pneumonia.

 

Lara
I Am Curious posted:

to echo @Lara, same for sore throat and chest tightness, particularly for those with both asthma and allergies. Postnasal drip causes a sore throat for me and I always have a tight chest around dust and ragweed. Those are the literal symptoms of COVID-19... I guess you can't please everyone and nothing is ever clear, ha. We have to do our best to pay close attention to our bodies, ask ourselves if what we are experiencing is unusual and act accordingly. 

Hi - you and @Lara bring up good points! Do you find that you are more in tune with your body due to allergies and asthma? I think I am, although I still often ignore signs and symptoms :-) A fever may be the 1 symptom that notifies us something else may be going on. 

Lorene

to echo @Lara, same for sore throat and chest tightness, particularly for those with both asthma and allergies. Postnasal drip causes a sore throat for me and I always have a tight chest around dust and ragweed. Those are the literal symptoms of COVID-19... I guess you can't please everyone and nothing is ever clear, ha. We have to do our best to pay close attention to our bodies, ask ourselves if what we are experiencing is unusual and act accordingly. 

IA

Welcome C St Ours - that's are complicated situation. It would be best to call or message your doctor to get their advice on ways you best protect yourself or if you should distance yourself from people who are potentially sick. Have you discussed options with your supervisor about possibly working in areas where you might have less exposure?

Kathy P

Hello, 

As someone who will be 60 yrs of age this year, has asthma and moderate obstructive disease, I am wondering if I should be staying home from work?  I just returned to work after having Type A flu and pneumonia (yes, I did get my flu vaccine :-)). This was my second time having the flu this winter!

I work in a pediatric practice; so children/families come in to be seen who are sick. The schools are all closed in my state, a national state of emergency has been declared in light of the current coronavirus pandemic.

Can you please advise?

Thank you!

 

CS
Karleeta posted:
Lorene posted:
Karleeta posted:

I am new to this so I am not sure how to go about this. I am a worried mama right now. My son who is asthmatic just had to go to the ER due to breathing problems. The said it was just his asthma due to no fever. But with it coming to close to comfort near me I am worried and want to know the true symptoms. I hear so many different things that it has me so worried. My daughter is asthmatic too but so far no breathing problems right now. Please can someone give me some possible reassurance that I am doing everything right? We have plenty of antibacterial soap and lots of sanitizer. What else should I do for them?

Hi @Karleeta we completely understand your concern and fear. Fever and a dry cough are symptoms of a virus. If your son is not running a fever it very well could just be an asthma flare. I hope he is feeling better? 

The best thing you can do is to make sure both your children take their asthma medications as directed. Do they have asthma action plans? Keep them at home as much as possible, wipe down surfaces with disinfectant wipes, wash hands often and keep them from touching their faces. At the first sign of any symptom, call your doctor to ask for guidance. 

It sounds like you are doing everything you can do, including being a caring momma. Hugs to you!

Lorene 

Lorene, Thank you for responding back to me. He is feeling a little better. Thank you for asking. They do have Asthma Action Plans. They are with grandparents for a couple days while we make sure our home is disinfectant really good. They are already on top with the washing of the hands and using hand sanitizer. We have been stressing that with them. I know their school just postponed it for another week. I know they will be staying home and not go no where. That is another reason why they are with grandparents so I can do all my shopping and not have to take them with me and all. Thank you again. 

Karleeta

Hi there! I am so glad he is feeling a little better. It can take such a long time to recover from an asthma flare. Sending healing mojo your way! 

I have been carrying disinfectant wipes with me and literally have one in my hand all the time to open doors and hit elevator buttons. I'm also using my elbows and hips instead of my hands as much as possible. 

The virus can live on some surfaces for up to 3 days, so a good cleaning sounds like a good plan, and will probably give you some peace of mind, too. I hope they enjoy their time with their grandparents. 

Keep doing what you're doing and please keep us posted. 

Lorene 

Lorene
Lorene posted:
Karleeta posted:

I am new to this so I am not sure how to go about this. I am a worried mama right now. My son who is asthmatic just had to go to the ER due to breathing problems. The said it was just his asthma due to no fever. But with it coming to close to comfort near me I am worried and want to know the true symptoms. I hear so many different things that it has me so worried. My daughter is asthmatic too but so far no breathing problems right now. Please can someone give me some possible reassurance that I am doing everything right? We have plenty of antibacterial soap and lots of sanitizer. What else should I do for them?

Hi @Karleeta we completely understand your concern and fear. Fever and a dry cough are symptoms of a virus. If your son is not running a fever it very well could just be an asthma flare. I hope he is feeling better? 

The best thing you can do is to make sure both your children take their asthma medications as directed. Do they have asthma action plans? Keep them at home as much as possible, wipe down surfaces with disinfectant wipes, wash hands often and keep them from touching their faces. At the first sign of any symptom, call your doctor to ask for guidance. 

It sounds like you are doing everything you can do, including being a caring momma. Hugs to you!

Lorene 

Lorene, Thank you for responding back to me. He is feeling a little better. Thank you for asking. They do have Asthma Action Plans. They are with grandparents for a couple days while we make sure our home is disinfectant really good. They are already on top with the washing of the hands and using hand sanitizer. We have been stressing that with them. I know their school just postponed it for another week. I know they will be staying home and not go no where. That is another reason why they are with grandparents so I can do all my shopping and not have to take them with me and all. Thank you again. 

Karleeta

K

This is going to be the "unpopular" opinion, but it is one more should consider. You will not eliminate disease with a paper mask. You cannot prevent a future asthma attack by stockpiling medication. The virus takes about two weeks to become apparent and it will definitely have killed you within the month if it is going to be your cause of death. Do what you've always done, but do it better. Be clean. Be aware of your condition. Be considerate of those around you. Most of all, be rational. Don't risk the health of your friends, family, or community to have 2 months worth of supplies and leave them with none. More people being able to take precautions means less people spreading germs.

E
Last edited by Ender
Karleeta posted:

I am new to this so I am not sure how to go about this. I am a worried mama right now. My son who is asthmatic just had to go to the ER due to breathing problems. The said it was just his asthma due to no fever. But with it coming to close to comfort near me I am worried and want to know the true symptoms. I hear so many different things that it has me so worried. My daughter is asthmatic too but so far no breathing problems right now. Please can someone give me some possible reassurance that I am doing everything right? We have plenty of antibacterial soap and lots of sanitizer. What else should I do for them?

Hi @Karleeta we completely understand your concern and fear. Fever and a dry cough are symptoms of a virus. If your son is not running a fever it very well could just be an asthma flare. I hope he is feeling better? 

The best thing you can do is to make sure both your children take their asthma medications as directed. Do they have asthma action plans? Keep them at home as much as possible, wipe down surfaces with disinfectant wipes, wash hands often and keep them from touching their faces. At the first sign of any symptom, call your doctor to ask for guidance. 

It sounds like you are doing everything you can do, including being a caring momma. Hugs to you!

Lorene 

Lorene

I am new to this so I am not sure how to go about this. I am a worried mama right now. My son who is asthmatic just had to go to the ER due to breathing problems. The said it was just his asthma due to no fever. But with it coming to close to comfort near me I am worried and want to know the true symptoms. I hear so many different things that it has me so worried. My daughter is asthmatic too but so far no breathing problems right now. Please can someone give me some possible reassurance that I am doing everything right? We have plenty of antibacterial soap and lots of sanitizer. What else should I do for them?

K

The Q&A states that data indicates no higher mortality risk for people that have asthma and contract COVID-19.  

worldometers web site provides statistics that suggest asthma suffers mortality rates as follows:

Condition:
 
Chronic respiratory disease
Death Rate 
Confirmed Cases:
8.0%
Death Rate
All Cases:
6.3%

There are two sources they use that provide age, sex, and morbidity statistics:

  • The Report of the WHO-China Joint Mission published on Feb. 28 by WHO, [2] which is based on 55,924 laboratory confirmed cases. The report notes that "The Joint Mission acknowledges the known challenges and biases of reporting crude CFR early in an epidemic" (see also our discussion on: How to calculate the mortality rate during an outbreak)
  • A paper by the Chinese CCDC released on Feb. 17, which is based on 72,314confirmed, suspected, and asymptomatic cases of COVID-19 in China as of Feb. 11, and was published in the Chinese Journal of Epidemiology [1]

 

Is this data invalid or can you clarify mortality rates for other respiratory diseases vs. asthma?

M
Candace posted:
Ellie89 posted:

I too am desperately looking for hints on what to do in the Covid-19 situation as someone with Asthma.

From what I understand, I am not more likely to contract the virus, but it is likely that it will affect me more strongly once I do. Given the fact that at this point, we're mostly talking about "when" we will all be infected, rather than "if" - shouldn't it be the logical next step to quarantine everyone who's part of the higher risk demographic?

I have a job that I could potentially do from home, however my bosses are rather reluctant to allow it. As of now, every article and every website contains slightly different information - again, even though the common ground already seems to be that the absolute majority of people will in fact be infected. As long as there is not one unified opinion on this, or even an official statement recommending people that are at a higher risk to stay home, what do I tell my bosses? Or do I just continue to get on public transport and walk around the office, all while hoping for the best? I just can't believe there's no better way to deal with this.

Thanks in advance for your replies

My husband has adult-onset asthma and controls it with daily medication, however, I am still concerned what would happen to him if he contracted coronavirus, since I've seen him battle numerous sinus infections and suffer considerably. He is a college instructor and is exposed to many people on a daily basis. I do not have asthma, but also want to avoid becoming ill so I don't infect him, so we are both on a daily vitamin regimen of immune-boosting vitamins, including D3, C, fish oil, B2, B12, and a multivitamin that includes recommended daily doses of other immune-boosting vitamins. I have taken all of these vitamins regularly, but my husband hasn't until the past week. We also eat mostly plant-based foods and avoid processed foods and excess sugar. I also asked my husband to start exercising regularly. We exercise together for motivation. I know that 100% grape juice (3 8oz. glasses/day) also boosts immunity. I learned about it when researching how to increase immunity several years ago when I was also teaching. Taking the vitamins and grape juice and exercising at least 3 days/week enabled me to avoid becoming ill when I previously contracted an illness every quarter I taught. I have never heard anyone at the CDC or WHO recommend vitamins to boost immunity, recommend maintaining regular cardiovascular exercise, or recommend a healthy diet, but based on recommendations from our family physician and reading other physicians' advice, I feel that all of these are imporant to include into our regular regimen to avoid becoming ill in the first place. I want us to do everything in our power to stay healthy. BTW - I have not yet heard that the majority of people living in the U.S. will become infected, so I hope that is not an absolute. All the best!

Hi! thanks for sharing your tips on how your and husband stay healthy. Just a precaution, people should always check with their health care provider before starting any supplements or even vitamins to make sure they will not interfere with current medications. Eating a healthy diet and exercising are great strategies to staying healthy throughout the year. Again, talking to a health care provider to ensure diet and exercise are safe is recommended. Grape juice contains a lot of sugar, so anyone with diabetes or other conditions should OK this with their doctor. ~ Lorene 

Lorene
Fraser posted:

 Many thanks for the reply appreciate it. I may of confused people but what I was really trying to say was “should I start using my preventer now to reduce the possibility of asthma symptoms being triggered by covid19”?

 Hi @Fraser - this is a really great question that many people have. All medicines have side effects, and taking additional medication when it is not needed is a decision to be made between you and your doctor. Additionally, being on a preventer medicine may not reduce asthma symptoms if you were to get an infection. My recommendation is to talk to your doctor about a plan to manage your asthma at the first sign of symptoms, and update your asthma action plan accordingly. Is that doable? ~ Lorene 

Lorene

 Many thanks for the reply appreciate it. I may of confused people but what I was really trying to say was “should I start using my preventer now to reduce the possibility of asthma symptoms being triggered by covid19”?

F
Last edited by Melissa G
Candace posted:
Ellie89 posted:

I too am desperately looking for hints on what to do in the Covid-19 situation as someone with Asthma.

From what I understand, I am not more likely to contract the virus, but it is likely that it will affect me more strongly once I do. Given the fact that at this point, we're mostly talking about "when" we will all be infected, rather than "if" - shouldn't it be the logical next step to quarantine everyone who's part of the higher risk demographic?

I have a job that I could potentially do from home, however my bosses are rather reluctant to allow it. As of now, every article and every website contains slightly different information - again, even though the common ground already seems to be that the absolute majority of people will in fact be infected. As long as there is not one unified opinion on this, or even an official statement recommending people that are at a higher risk to stay home, what do I tell my bosses? Or do I just continue to get on public transport and walk around the office, all while hoping for the best? I just can't believe there's no better way to deal with this.

Thanks in advance for your replies

My husband has adult-onset asthma and controls it with daily medication, however, I am still concerned what would happen to him if he contracted coronavirus, since I've seen him battle numerous sinus infections and suffer considerably. He is a college instructor and is exposed to many people on a daily basis. I do not have asthma, but also want to avoid becoming ill so I don't infect him, so we are both on a daily vitamin regimen of immune-boosting vitamins, including D3, C, fish oil, B2, B12, and a multivitamin that includes recommended daily doses of other immune-boosting vitamins. I have taken all of these vitamins regularly, but my husband hasn't until the past week. We also eat mostly plant-based foods and avoid processed foods and excess sugar. I also asked my husband to start exercising regularly. We exercise together for motivation. I know that 100% grape juice (3 8oz. glasses/day) also boosts immunity. I learned about it when researching how to increase immunity several years ago when I was also teaching. Taking the vitamins and grape juice and exercising at least 3 days/week enabled me to avoid becoming ill when I previously contracted an illness every quarter I taught. I have never heard anyone at the CDC or WHO recommend vitamins to boost immunity, recommend maintaining regular cardiovascular exercise, or recommend a healthy diet, but based on recommendations from our family physician and reading other physicians' advice, I feel that all of these are imporant to include into our regular regimen to avoid becoming ill in the first place. I want us to do everything in our power to stay healthy. BTW - I have not yet heard that the majority of people living in the U.S. will become infected, so I hope that is not an absolute. All the best!

Hi Candace,

thanks for your comprehensive reply. I think it's a smart move to boost your immune system with supplements, fruits and veggies. Since my husband also has a history of illness (though related to the pancreas), he spent a lot of time researching supplements and we are well-equipped I believe.

Concerning the number of infections: I'm based in Germany and referring to the situation here. Indeed, chancellor Merkel herself admitted today that 60-70% of Germans will be infected: https://nypost.com/2020/03/11/...uld-get-coronavirus/

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