National Healthy Schools Day Highlights the Need for Better School Environments for Children with Asthma

 

Asthma is the main reason why children miss school. In fact, children in the U.S. miss about 13.8 million school days each year due to asthma. Missing school can affect many children's grades and well-being.

Controlling asthma triggers at home can help reduce asthma symptoms. But what about at school? If kids are exposed to triggers at school, managing asthma at home will be a losing battle.

April 3, 2018, is National Healthy Schools Day. The Healthy Schools Network uses this day to highlight how school environments affect the health and learning of school children.

Children are the most affected by air pollution and poor indoor air quality. The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America is a supporter of National Healthy Schools Day. We believe healthier schools can help children not only perform better in school but have better quality of life.

How Can I Help My School to Be Healthier?

Tell your child's teacher and school administrators about National Healthy Schools Day. Share these websites with your school: nationalhealthyschoolsday.org, aafa.org, epa.gov and cdc.gov for more information about healthy school environments and activities.

Help us support National Healthy Schools Day by spreading the word about how we need healthier schools for our children to learn in!

Learn more about National Healthy Schools Day:

Are you interesting in talking with others about ways to improve indoor air quality at home, work and school? Join our community to connect with others who manage asthma to work together for healthier environments.

JOIN NOW

Add Comment

Comments (4)

Newest · Oldest · Popular

Ironmom316, that us not cool    I have seen dogs in my allergist office waitingvroom that are service dogs and I am like(to staff)--this is an allergist office waiting room and they wete like, well you can wait outside (to me). I went to a different allergist after that. If you cannot get a policy addressed correctly, switching out is always an option. I am super-allergic to dander and it developed into a serious chronic allergic disease after regularly being around dander that caused danage to my heart and I am still recovering. This is a goid thing that one school did to address the issue: 

https://www.google.com/url?sa=...5yH3_pytOsQ86lrytDZY

I think this is a great topic, and National Healthy School Days is a great way to educate children, parents, teachers, and the community on asthma and allergies. 

I think it would be worth noting the studies on second-hand dander and how it significantly affects children with asthma and allergies in schools (i.e. the study thst shows the more cat owners in classroom there are, the worse prognosis with kids with allergies and asthma). I think having individual lockers outside classrooms for coats and backpacks (which are reservoirs for animal dander) would help. Other things they mention in the links above would also help reduce dander inside, such as clearing clutter, having hard floors, not having classroom pets that have dander inside the classroom, and cleaning properly. 

×
×
×
×