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Tagged With "Covid"

Tagged With "Covid"

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    Just yesterday at dr appt I walked 3 flight of stairs, I avoid elevators, & by the time I reached floor of dr office I was so out of breath & heart beating so fast. It took few minutes to feel normal. I am out of shape so if in shape I wouldn’t have felt as bad but without mask I know I wouldn’t feel so out of breath Also mondays the only day I work in office, I wear mask all day & takes me some time in morning to not breathe so hard/not practically hyperventilate. Most Monday’s...
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    Blah blah blah. Probably just a numbers game. Wonder who requested the test. Too many tests are geared to get the answers they want and not true results. The same amount of oxygen does go through a mask, but with breathing issues, it is harder to pull the same volume of air through it. Kind of like a vacuum cleaner trying to suck a rag though. Any activity with a mask on I am huffing and puffing very hard and my chest starts hurting severely. Same activity without a mask, no issues.
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    Interesting. Is there a link to the study? I am curious about where it was done (indoor or outdoor, at what temp, and at what exertion level). I tend to do fine indoors with ac for short periods of time, but in heat, add sweat, and exertion.. I find myself needing to tear that mask off and get relief just breathing with it off (I do mask breaks away from others). I am curious if these conditions (time, heat/humidity, exertion level) can be lab replicated and studied in others? (Or if they...
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    Hmm. I don't know. I looked iver the study. I do think they need more information and more numbers representing different groups of asthma and activity levels. It said n=3 on the n95 masks meaning that is the amount if people they are making that judgment on? Because, personally I feel n95 masks and cloth masks do affect breathing differently. I think exertion is the key thing Id want them to look at for asthmatics-- exertion and any tine when asthma is kinda flaring up and breathing can...
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    You need to start with the low income children's homes. How do you research mold growing on drywall and burst pipes in low incomes children's actual home? Mold is first a low income problem. The pipes and buildings are getting old. Not considering investigating mold is giving the poor a death sentence!
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    We agree with you, lori 1022. The problem spans all aspects of life: education, housing, work, transportation, medical care, recreation and basic activities of daily living. We need laws to protect people who are allergic and/or anxious, as there is direct discrimination even in the laws that are written. People are taking their dogs everywhere, because first the legal system allowed them to, and then it became socially acceptable. The media has become an enormous partner in the problem,...
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    The problem is that companies are too cheap to do it right and/or the ventilation companies are worthless. A local big box pharmacy has air flow in and out of their area. Having their pharmacy at positive pressure would keep all the customer's germs out of the dispensing area. People complain about smoky businesses: one bar I used to go to had 200 people that smoked and their air was clear, whereas you couldn't see across another bar that only had 30 smoking. A local ventilation company...
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    Thank you @mdashiquennobi ! Please be sure your AAFA member profile is up to date . When research studies come up that may match your profile information, we will send the opportunity to you via email. Also keep an eye on our blog where we publish surveys that are open to our members to join in. You can change your notifications so that you receive an email every time we add a new blog. Thanks so much for contributing to asthma research!
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    We have updated this blog post to reflect more recent information on the 2019 new coronavirus (COVID-19). Even though coronavirus numbers have risen worldwide, people in the U.S. are still at a greater risk of getting the flu. Keep washing your hands and avoiding people who are sick. And don't forget to follow your Asthma Action Plan if you start feeling ill.
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    I have intermittent asthma. I usually manage my symptoms (wheezing during the pollen season) with antihistamines and sometimes the Ventolin inhaler. I had an attack about a month ago and the last time before that was 10 years ago. For the most recent attack, I was prescribed Deltacortril for five days, and they certainly sorted the problem. The doctor also suggested I take a preventive inhaler to keep the asthma at bay. However, I read on the internet that the preventive inhaler which...
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    Hi @Azmtick - those are all great questions! Many long-term controller or preventative medicine inhalers do contain an inhaled corticosteroid. These prevent and reduce airway swelling. They also reduce mucus in the lungs. They are the most effective long-term control medicines available. It's important to keep taking your controller medicine even when you don't have symptoms because they prevent asthma symptoms. Stopping your controller medicine may increase your asthma symptoms and the risk...
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    I can't find any information anywhere about patients with asthma (specifically) and COVID-19 mortality rates. I am a relatively healthy individual with mild but persistent allergy triggered asthma. My singulair seems to keep it under control. I've had the flu twice this season (different strains) with no complications. But, I am curious, so these are my questions: I've heard that the jury is still out on what exactly causes respiratory complications from viruses in people with asthma. Some...
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    Hello @I Am Curious , I am happy to hear you weathered two different flu virus strains this year without complications! Most healthy people recover from flu without complications (and is what is being seen in coronavirus COVID-19 as well). But when you have asthma, it can put you at higher risk because asthmatic lungs already have swelling. When you have a respiratory infection, your immune system responds by creating more mucus and releasing substances from your cells to fight the virus or...
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    Distributed via the CDC Health Alert Network February 28, 2020, 1505 ET (3:05 PM ET) Update and Interim Guidance on Outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Summary The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) continues to closely monitor and respond to the COVID-19 outbreak caused by the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. This CDC Health Alert Network (HAN) Update provides updated guidance on evaluating and testing persons under investigation (PUIs) for COVID-19. It supersedes...
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    I’m not sure the flu comparison is terribly helpful here. There is a flu vaccine which at least keeps some types of flu at bay, if not all. Despite the fact that we are generally familiar with coronaviruses, there is much we still don’t know about this one. For example, there seem to be indicators that people are spreading the virus while asymptomatic, but no one is sure how. If this is indeed the case, then that makes infection control much more difficult. I’m worried about my baby. She’s...
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    Both my young adult kids have Flu- and cold-virus induced asthma. One of them is on the other side of the country at college. What do we know about the risk of Covid-19 with patients with this type of asthma? They both had their flu shots last fall. Should we be stocking up on anti-viral medication or Prednisone? The anti-viral medication really helped reduce the symptoms my son experienced in years past when he got the flu (which he got despite getting the flu vaccination).
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    I just read an article today that stated do not take steroids for the corona virus. It makes it worse. 1. is this true? 2. nebulizers and rescue inhalers are essentially steroidal. Does this also apply to them? 3. should we try to avoid using this if we contract the virus?
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    Thank you all for submitting your questions! We are working on updating our blog above with updated numbers and recommendations. We have also sent a list of questions to our Medical Scientific Council and will share the information as soon as we hear back from the council. Stay safe and keep washing your hands!
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    We need a practical article that will be radically honest and realistic about how to survive this as immune-compromised people. What concrete steps should we take WHEN (not “if”) this virus spreads to our community? For example, I am doing the following: procuring an N95 mask to use in public when the virus becomes pervasive; filling all prescriptions I may need if I get sick (inhalers, prednisone, etc.); getting the pneumonia vaccine to prevent the secondary infection if I can; stocking up...
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    Welcome CoachBW - we are working on getting the blog updated and have asked our medical advisors specific questions. Your plan follows many of the CDC recommendations for how to prepare your household for a possible COVID-19 outbreak . One reminder about masks is that they are most effective when worn by someone who is sick to prevent the spread of the virus through cough droplets. In general, masks don't provide much protection to someone who is not sick. You'd have to be directly...
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    I absolutely agree with you CoachBW. I've been all around the internet looking for solid advise. I thought this would be one place where i could get some specific advice. Hoping better answers come sooner than later.
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    The title of your article is misleading; there is no information in your article specific to people suffering from asthma. Contracting coronavirus and having asthma as an underlying condition has been highly publicized as leading to critical health issues or fatalities. Your article offers nothing specific to asthma. You should consider changing the article title to: Coronavirus: What You Need to Know, since the content is general information for the public, until you actually have content...
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    Thank you for the updates! Super helpful! I just wanted to point out that the one study that found no to link to increased risk of complications in persons with asthma also didn't study anyone with asthma. Ie none of the 140 had (or knew they had) asthma. I think that's an important detail. The wording of the study itself, concerning asthma and allergic diseases, is misleading until you read the whole thing. Two patients had COPD and they both had grim outcomes. Take what you want from that,...
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    I just think that N95 masks can be helpful. They found the size of the corona virus and those masks block that size particle and yes it needs a tight seal but that is perfectly possible to teach people what that is. It can help. And high-risk population should know this and have time to irder and waut fir one before it gets widespread. And its possible to make enough for everyone including healthcare workers. And it doesnt need to be mandated fir everyobe, it usnt 100 percent, but it can...
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    i suffer from seasonal allergies & it’s been bad especially in NYC ... my doctor 🥼 gave me a cortisone shot on the buttocks to i believe reduce my allergies symptoms & told me i won’t have to do it again till next month... my question is , if the cortisone shot weakens the immune system was it a smart decision to trust my doctor while the corona virus is out & around my state & actually my county ... i can’t imagine why he wouldn’t take that into consideration & discuss...
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    I have asthma but it is well controlled with medication. My 4 year old son also has mild asthma that is typically aggravated by colds. He is too young for control medications at least based on his pattern of symptoms. He uses a nebulizer when he is sick. We are traveling in a few weeks and I am very concerned about him. I am trying not to be paranoid but, it is hard when so little is known. He is 4 so handwashing is a constant battle. I feel like I should put a mask on him at least on the...
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    Usually one shot doesn't do enough to weaken your immune system. The dosage is too small and it's only a one time thing. If you were to get shots frequently and on a regular basis, it would have more of an effect on the strength of your immune system and your doctor would be required to let you know. But in an otherwise healthy individual with only one shot, you should be in the clear. This is just what my doctor told me. I'm no doctor. If you to be super thorough, call your doctors office...
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    Hi @AG - I don't blame you for being concerned for your little one. According to the CDC, there is no evidence that children are more susceptible to the virus. In fact, most confirmed cases reported from China have been in adults. The CDC says "Children and their family members should engage in usual preventive actions to prevent the spread of respiratory infections, including covering coughs, cleaning hands often with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer, and staying up to date on...
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    Hi @Candace - we appreciate your feedback. Have you checked out the latest update? There is a Q&A with Mitchell Grayson, M.D., FAAAAI, FACAAI, allergist/immunologist at Nationwide Children's Hospital and chair of AAFA’s Medical Scientific Council . He specifically addresses asthma and COVID-19. Lorene
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    Hi @Shea N95 masks may provide a layer of protection, but they may be hard to breathe through when you have asthma or an infection. They can also be hot, and often masks lead to people touching their face more in an effort to make the mask most comfortable. Wearing a mask can't hurt, but hand washing and sanitizing are going to be our best bet for protection. Thank you for sharing your thoughts. Lorene
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