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Tagged With "Wildfires"

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Study Shows a Difference Between the Effects of Controlled Burns vs. Wildfires

AAFA Community Services ·
Controlled burns are often used to help reduce and contain wildfires, but it turns out which burn is occurring can actually have an effect on your health, according to research presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI).
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Re: Wildfire Season Has Begun – and It Affects Air Quality and Asthma

AAFA Community Services ·
We updated this blog post on Aug. 19, 2020, to include information on extra precautions you need to take during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Blog Post

Wildfire Season Has Begun – and It Affects Air Quality and Asthma

AAFA Community Services ·
Each year, wildfires rage across the U.S. They have already begun in California this year. Smoke in the air contains tiny particles that affect air quality. These particles can irritate your eyes, nose, throat and lungs. Poor air quality can worsen asthma symptoms . Children and those with respiratory disease like asthma are at high risk for asthma episodes when the air quality is poor. Wildfires do not only affect those in the immediate fire area. Smoke can blow many miles away and impact...
Blog Post

Public Health Emergency: Wildfires in the Western U.S. Cause Dangerous Air Pollution for People With Asthma

AAFA Community Services ·
Record-setting wildfires continue to rage across the western United States, putting millions of people with asthma at risk. The smoke and ash from the fires are polluting the air , creating unhealthy – even hazardous – air quality. This is a serious health emergency. What Do People With Asthma Need to Know About the Current Wildfires and Air Quality? The EPA’s AirNow.gov program measures and reports the air quality across the United States. Air quality is measured by the number of small...
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