People With Asthma Will Benefit From Nationwide Public Housing Smoking Ban

 

A U.S. Housing and Urban Development (HUD) ban on smoking in public housing starts July 31, 2018.

According to the rule, no one can smoke inside public housing. They also cannot smoke within 25 feet of any public housing building.

This will be a big benefit to people with asthma who live in public housing. Tobacco smoke can do a lot of damage to your health. It has more than 7,000 toxic chemicals. But it can even be more harmful to people who have asthma, especially children and older adults.

"The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America is thrilled to see this rule put in place in our nation's public housing," says Kenneth Mendez, President and CEO of AAFA. "Asthma-friendly living environments are important. And HUD is setting a strong example. This is an excellent step toward reducing asthma rates. Hopefully, other renters and housing agencies will follow suit."

Children are at highest risk of lung damage from tobacco smoke. Secondhand and thirdhand smoke affect them the most. Studies show children exposed to tobacco smoke:

  • Are at high risk of lung damage
  • Get sick more often
  • Wheeze and cough more
  • Have worse and more frequent asthma attacks
  • Have more asthma-related emergency room visits

Banning smoking in public housing will help people with asthma reduce asthma symptoms and have better quality of life. Children with asthma will miss fewer school days and reduce their risk of asthma attacks.

To reduce your exposure to tobacco smoke:

  • Ask others to not smoke in or near your home
  • Visit smoke-free homes and businesses
  • Chose smoke-free childcare with non-smoking caregivers
  • If you smoke, do your best to quit

For help to stop smoking, call 1-800-QUIT-NOW or visit smokefree.gov.

It is important to stay up-to-date on news about asthma and allergies. By joining our community and following our blog, you will receive news about research and treatments. Our community also provides an opportunity to connect with other patients who manage these conditions for support.

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Comments (1)

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I am trying to quit smoking but have to say that 25 feet OUTSIDE is a bit much.  Very few people smoke....so it;s not exactly a smokestack outside.  Smoke is bad I agree but many disabled people cannot get 25 feet and live in public housing.  I see both sides.

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