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Asthma Impacts on the Hispanic Population

Hispanic Americans make up more than 18% of the U.S. population – making them the second largest population group. And the U.S. Census Bureau projects that this group will account for more than 27% of the U.S. population by 2060. As the population becomes more racially and ethnically diverse, it becomes increasingly important to address disparities in asthma.

Managing Asthma at School During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Update: Sept. 23, 2021 The COVID-19 and Asthma Toolkit for Schools has been updated per current CDC and AAFA guidance on face masks, physical distancing, cleaning procedures, and more. The average American classroom of 30 students will have about three students with asthma. 1 And since 19 million adults in the U.S. have asthma, schools will have teachers and staff with asthma too. 2 Creating a more asthma-friendly environment in schools may help students and staff better control their asthma...

Managing Peak Week, the Time When Asthma Attacks Are at Their Worst

COVID-19 made it clearer than ever that breathing shouldn’t be taken for granted and lung health is getting some long-overdue national attention. But for those who live with asthma – a serious, chronic disease of the lungs that causes the airways to be inflamed and narrow – the constant concern over breathing is ever-present. Approximately 25 million Americans have asthma, and the effects can be even more extreme for the 2.5 million suffering from severe asthma, a form of asthma requiring...

DANGER! Don’t Nebulize Hydrogen Peroxide and Breathe It to Try to Treat or Prevent COVID-19

A concerning and dangerous trend is circulating on social media channels like Facebook, Twitter, and TikTok. People are breathing in hydrogen peroxide through nebulizers to try to prevent or treat COVID-19. DO NOT put hydrogen peroxide into your nebulizer and breathe it in. This is dangerous! It is not a way to prevent nor treat COVID-19. Visit aafa.org/covid19 for information about asthma, allergies, and COVID-19. Hydrogen peroxide can be used as a cleaner and stain remover, and can cause...

FDA Issues Statement on Steps They Will Take to Ensure COVID-19 Vaccines Are Safe and Effective for Young Children

As regulators, the FDA recognizes they have an important task ahead of them that will require them to act expeditiously while undertaking an extremely meticulous and thoughtful review once we receive requests to authorize a COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use or submissions for approval of a COVID-19 vaccine for this population.

Ragweed Woes: How to Win Against One of Pollen’s Worst Offenders

Say “ragweed” in a crowded room and you’re sure to hear some groans. Why? Because ragweed is the most common weed pollen allergy , affecting about 15% of Americans. If you have a ragweed pollen allergy, you may already have seasonal allergic rhinitis (“hay fever”) symptoms. Ragweed pollen season shows up in August and peaks in mid-September in most parts of the United States, especially in Eastern and Midwestern states. Hay fever is also known as seasonal allergic rhinitis . Symptoms...

September Asthma Epidemic: Help the People With Asthma in Your Care Avoid Asthma Attacks

If you care for someone with asthma , have you noticed that their asthma always seem to get worse in September? If so, you’re not alone. In fact, researchers have studied this issue. Here is what they found. September Is a Difficult Time for People With Asthma There is a September asthma hospital stay “epidemic.” In fact, the third week of September is considered Asthma Peak Week. Many more people stay in the hospital for asthma shortly after school starts than at any other time of the year.

Causes of Fall Allergy Symptoms and What You Can Do About Them

Ah, fall! Time for cozy jackets, colorful leaves, pumpkin spice lattes, and … allergy medicine? If you’ve noticed the change in season also triggers allergy and asthma symptoms, you’re not alone. Just like spring, fall is a time when many people are seeking relief from their seasonal allergies . Common symptoms of seasonal allergies include: Itching in the nose and eyes Sneezing Stuffy nose (congestion) Runny nose Mucus (phlegm) in the throat (postnasal drip) Do You Live in an Allergy...

Getting Our Children Back to School Safely During the COVID-19 Pandemic

It’s officially back-to-school season as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact the United States. And getting our children safely back to school is a major priority for the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA). To help schools create safe learning environments, AAFA sent a letter to the School Superintendents Association (AASA) . The letter outlines two key recommendations: School districts should use American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds to improve indoor air quality in...

7 Things You May Not Know About Ragweed Pollen Allergy

Ragweed pollen allergy is a major cause of seasonal allergies, also known as “hay fever.” Its light pollen easily spreads far and wide, triggering nasal allergies and allergic asthma in its path. If you have a ragweed pollen allergy, it helps to know what you are up against. If you live in the U.S., you probably feel the effects of ragweed pollen in the late summer and fall. Here are some things you may not know about ragweed. Ragweed Season Peaks in Mid-September Ragweed starts pollinating...

Asthma-Related Deaths and Disparities: Reducing the Risk

The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America’s 2021 Asthma Capitals ™ report ranks the largest 100 U.S. metropolitan cities by how challenging they are to live in with asthma. AAFA publishes this report to help people who live in Asthma Capitals advocate for better care and policies. The report also shows how communities can best direct their focus to reduce the impact of asthma. In our report, we looked at three weighted outcomes to determine rankings: asthma prevalence, asthma-related...

Sources of Air Pollution in Your Home That May Cause Asthma and Allergy Symptoms

Animal dander , pollen , mold , dust mites , and fumes released by cooking, burning fuel, or cleaning products can all have an impact on your indoor air. The health risks from poor indoor air quality can often be much worse than outdoor air. It is important to understand the sources of indoor air pollution. Allergens are a major source of indoor air pollution in homes. Common indoor allergens include animal dander, pollen, mold, dust mites, cockroaches, and more. Dust mites and pet dander...

Learn How to Manage Nasal Polyps (Live Online Event)

Nasal polyps are small, non-cancerous growths on the lining of the inside of your nose or sinus cavities. Some people who have asthma, allergic rhinitis , or chronic sinusitis may also have nasal polyps. Are you impacted by nasal polyps? If you or someone you care for has nasal polyps, you’ll want to know how to work with a doctor to find an effective treatment. The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) is excited to partner with PlatformQ Health and MedLive for an educational...

Chronic Cough: What You Need to Know

*Sponsored by Merck Approximately 5% of adults in America are living with chronic cough, which is defined as a cough that lasts longer than 8 weeks. Patients with the condition commonly cough in “bouts” they cannot control, and usually feel a strong urge to cough before a coughing bout starts. Chronic cough is commonly associated with other health conditions, such as asthma, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), upper airway cough syndrome and non-asthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis. It can...

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